WISDOM TEETH

Introduction:

Wisdom teeth are the third and final set of molars that most people get in their late teens or early twenties. They’re called wisdom teeth because they come in at a time when people are considered “wiser” than they were as children. Most people have four wisdom teeth — one in each corner of the mouth. But it’s possible to have fewer, or even none at all. Wisdom teeth that don’t grow in (impacted wisdom teeth) are a very common problem.

Impacted wisdom teeth can cause a lot of pain and other problems. They can crowd or damage other teeth, and they can be hard to clean. This can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Impacted wisdom teeth that don’t cause problems don’t usually need to be removed.

Wisdom teeth removal is a common procedure, and most people have no serious problems with it. But like any surgery, there are some risks. These include pain, swelling, bleeding, infection, and damage to nearby teeth.

Wisdom Teeth symptoms:

Most people have no symptoms at all from their wisdom teeth. But in some cases, wisdom teeth can cause problems. Wisdom teeth that don’t have enough room to grow (impacted wisdom teeth) can crowd or damage other teeth. They may also partly come through the gum (erupt), and this can be painful. Impacted wisdom teeth that don’t cause problems don’t usually need to be removed.

Wisdom teeth that come in normally and are easy to clean don’t usually cause problems. But if they’re hard to reach with a toothbrush, food and plaque can build up on them. This can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Wisdom teeth that are growing in at an angle (tilted or sideways) are more likely to become impacted. They may also damage other teeth as they come in.

If your wisdom teeth are causing problems, you may have:

  • Pain
  • Swelling of the gums
  • Crowding or damage to other teeth
  • An infection
  • Cysts (fluid-filled sacs) around the wisdom tooth

Treatment for Wisdom Teeth:

  • If your wisdom teeth are causing problems, you may need to have them removed. This is a common procedure, and most people have no serious problems with it.
  • Wisdom teeth removal is usually done by an oral surgeon. The surgeon makes a small cut in the gum to reach the tooth. Then the tooth is removed, along with any bone that’s around it.
  • After the surgery, you may have some pain and swelling. This is normal, and it should go away in a few days. You can take pain medicine if you need to.
  • You may also have some bleeding, and your gums may be sore. You can rinse your mouth with salt water to help with the bleeding and soreness.
  • It’s important to follow all of your surgeon’s instructions after the surgery. This will help you heal quickly and reduce your risk of infection.

Risks of Wisdom Teeth removal:

Wisdom teeth removal is a common procedure, and most people have no serious problems with it. But like any surgery, there are some risks. These include pain, swelling, bleeding, infection, and damage to nearby teeth.

If you have wisdom teeth, your dentist or oral surgeon will watch them closely to see if they need to be removed. Wisdom teeth that are growing in normally usually don’t need to be removed.

Conclusion:

Wisdom teeth removal is a common procedure, and most people have no serious problems with it. However, as with any surgery, there are some risks involved including pain, swelling, bleeding, infection and damage to nearby teeth. If you have wisdom teeth, your dentist or oral surgeon will closely monitor them to determine if removal is necessary.

In most cases, wisdom teeth that are growing in normally do not need to be removed. However, if they are impacted or causing problems, surgery may be required. Following your surgeon’s post-operative instructions carefully will help you heal quickly and reduce your risk of infection.