SCALING AND ROOT PLANING

Introduction:

Scaling and root planing is a deep cleaning of your teeth below the gumline. It’s also called “periodontal debridement”. This procedure involves removing plaque and tartar from your teeth and roots. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. Tartar is plaque that has hardened on your teeth.

Procedure of Scaling and Root Planing:

Scaling and root planing is usually done by a dentist or dental hygienist. The procedure is often used to treat gum disease. It can also be done to prevent gum disease from getting worse.

1. The first step is scaling. This involves removing plaque and tartar from your teeth above and below the gumline. Your dentist or dental hygienist will use a hand-held instrument called a scaler to do this.

2. The next step is root planing. This involves removing tartar and plaque from the roots of your teeth. Your dentist or hygienist will use a hand-held instrument called a periodontal curette to do this.

3. After the scaling and root planing is complete, your dentist or hygienist may recommend a course of antibiotics to help kill the bacteria that cause gum disease.

4. You may also be given a mouthrinse to help reduce the bacteria in your mouth.

5. Your dentist or hygienist may also recommend that you have your teeth professionally cleaned every three to six months.

Side effects of Scaling and Root Planing:

There are a few potential side effects of scaling and root planing, including:

  • Bleeding gums
  • Gum soreness
  • Mouth pain
  • Inflammation
  • Infection
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Gum recession
  • Periodontal disease recurrence

If you experience any of these side effects, be sure to contact your dentist or oral health care provider. 

Conclusion:

Scaling and root planing is a common periodontal therapy used to treat gum disease. The procedure involves removing plaque and tartar from the teeth and roots, as well as smoothing out any rough spots on the roots that can trap bacteria.

Scaling and root planning can help to reduce inflammation and bleeding of the gums, as well as help to prevent further damage to the teeth and roots. The procedure is usually performed by a dentist or periodontist, and may require multiple visits depending on the severity of the gum disease.