ROOT CANAL THERAPY

Introduction:

Root canal therapy is a treatment to repair and save a tooth that is badly decayed or infected. The procedure involves removing the damaged tissue from inside the tooth, cleaning and disinfecting it, then filling and sealing it.

Root canal therapy is usually performed by a dentist or an endodontist (a specialist in treating problems with the teeth and their roots). It is usually a relatively quick and painless procedure, although it may require more than one visit to the dentist.

Types of Root Canal Therapy:

There are two main types of root canal therapy:

1. Conventional Root Canal Therapy:

This is the most common type of root canal therapy. It involves removing the damaged tissue from inside the tooth, cleaning and disinfecting it, then filling and sealing it. The procedure is usually performed over one or two visits to the dentist.

2. Minimally Invasive Root Canal Therapy (MIRT):

This is a newer type of root canal therapy that is less invasive than conventional root canal therapy. It involves making a small opening in the tooth to remove the damaged tissue and then sealing the opening. MIRT is usually performed in one visit to the dentist.

Benefits of Root Canal Therapy:

Root canal therapy can be used to treat a variety of problems, including:

  • Decay
  • Infection
  • Injury
  • Trauma

Root canal therapy is usually successful in treating the problem and saving the tooth. However, in some cases, the tooth may need to be removed (extracted).

Why might I need Root Canal Therapy?

If the pulp (the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue) becomes damaged or infected, it can cause pain, swelling, and irritation. Root canal therapy is needed to remove the damaged pulp and prevent the infection from spreading.

What happens during Root Canal Therapy?

Root canal therapy usually requires one or two visits to the dentist. During the first visit, the dentist will clean out the infected pulp and prepare the tooth for a filling. A temporary filling will be placed in the tooth to protect it until the second visit.

At the second visit, the dentist will remove the temporary filling and place a permanent filling or crown (a cap that covers the entire tooth) on the tooth.

What are the risks of Root Canal Therapy?

Root canal therapy is generally a safe and effective procedure. However, as with any medical procedure, there are some risks associated with root canal therapy. These risks include:

  • Pain or discomfort during the procedure
  • Swelling or bruising of the gums
  • Infection
  • Damage to the tooth or surrounding teeth

If you experience any pain or discomfort after root canal therapy, it is important to contact your dentist or endodontist immediately.

Conclusion:

Root canal therapy is usually performed by a dentist or an endodontist (a specialist in treating problems with the teeth and their roots). It is usually a relatively quick and painless procedure, although it may require more than one visit to the dentist. The procedure is usually successful in treating the problem and saving the tooth.

However, in some cases, the tooth may need to be removed (extracted). There are some risks associated with root canal therapy, but these are typically minor and can be easily managed by your dentist or endodontist. If you experience any pain or discomfort after root canal therapy, it is important to contact your dentist or endodontist immediately.