PRIMARY TEETH

Introduction:

Primary teeth are the first set of teeth that children have. They usually start to come in when a child is around 6 months old, and they all should be in by age 3. There are 20 primary teeth in all: 10 on the top and 10 on the bottom. Just like adult teeth, primary teeth have different shapes and names depending on where they are in the mouth.

Types of Primary Teeth:

There are four different types of primary teeth:

1. Incisors:

These are the teeth at the very front of the mouth, and they have a sharp, chisel-like shape. There are four incisors on the top and four on the bottom.

2. Canines:

Also called “cuspid” teeth, canines are the pointy teeth next to the incisors. There are two canines on the top and two on the bottom.

3. Molars:

Molars are the large, flat teeth at the back of the mouth. They have a wide surface area that is great for grinding food. There are four molars on the top and four on the bottom.

4. Wisdom Teeth:

Wisdom teeth are the third molars, and they usually come in during late adolescence or early adulthood. Many people have their wisdom teeth removed because there is often not enough room in the mouth for them.

Primary Teeth functions:

Primary teeth have important functions, even though they eventually fall out. They help children learn to speak clearly and chew properly. They also hold space in the mouth for the permanent teeth that are coming in later. If a child loses a primary tooth too early, the permanent tooth may come in crooked. Therefore, it’s important to take care of primary teeth and to see a dentist regularly.

Primary teeth are very important for several reasons:

  • They help children bite and chew food.
  • They help children speak clearly.
  • They help guide permanent teeth into place.
  • Children who do not have primary teeth can have trouble eating and speaking.

Signs of trouble:

There are a few signs that may indicate trouble with a child’s primary teeth:

1. Toothache: This can be a sign of decay or an infection.

2. Sensitivity to hot or cold: This can also be a sign of decay.

3. Swelling: This may be a sign of an infection.

4. Discharge: This may be a sign of an infection.

5. Bad breath: This may be a sign of gum disease.

If you notice any of these signs, be sure to take your child to see a dentist.

Care for Primary Teeth:

Just like permanent teeth, primary teeth need to be brushed and flossed regularly. This will help prevent decay and ensure that the teeth are healthy. It’s also important to see a dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.

Facts about Primary Teeth:

  • The first primary tooth usually erupts around 6 months old.
  • All 20 primary teeth should be in by age 3.
  • Primary teeth are important for speaking and chewing properly.
  • They also hold space in the mouth for permanent teeth.
  • Many children have their wisdom teeth removed because there is often not enough room in the mouth for them.
  • Primary teeth need to be brushed and flossed regularly.
  • It’s also important to see a dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.
  • The dentist will examine the teeth and gums, check for decay, clean the teeth, give fluoride treatments, and give any necessary immunizations.
  • Regular dental visits are an important part of keeping primary teeth healthy.

Conclusion:

Primary teeth are very important for several reasons. They help children bite and chew food, speak clearly, and guide permanent teeth into place. If a child loses a primary tooth too early, the permanent tooth may come in crooked. Therefore, it’s important to take care of primary teeth and to see a dentist regularly.

At your child’s checkup, the dentist will examine the teeth and gums, check for decay, clean the teeth, give fluoride treatments, and give any necessary immunizations. Regular dental visits are an important part of keeping primary teeth healthy.