CROWN

Introduction:

A crown is a dental restoration that is placed on the teeth to improve their appearance and function. Crowns are made of different materials, including metal alloys, porcelain, and resin. They can be used to restore a tooth’s shape and size, cover a cracked or fractured tooth, protect a weak tooth from breakage, or correct a dental malocclusion. Crowns are generally placed after other, more conservative treatments have been unsuccessful.

Crowns are not permanent and may need to be replaced or re-cemented over time. They are also not recommended for everyone and may not be appropriate for some teeth or dental conditions. Your dentist will be able to advise you on whether a crown is the right treatment for you.

Uses of Crown:

There are several reasons why your dentist might recommend a crown for one or more of your teeth. Some of the most common reasons include:

  • Restoring a tooth’s shape and size: A crown can be used to restore a tooth’s natural shape and size that may have been lost due to decay, fracture, or wear.
  • Covering a cracked or fractured tooth: A crown can be used to protect a cracked or fractured tooth from further damage.
  • Strengthening a weak tooth: A crown can be used to strengthen a weak tooth that is at risk of breaking.
  • Correcting a dental malocclusion: A crown can be used to correct a dental malocclusion (a misalignment of the teeth).

Crown is not recommended for:

There are also a few reasons why a crown might not be recommended, including:

  • Teeth that are too small or too large for a crown
  • Teeth that have extensive decay or infection
  • Teeth with a large filling in place
  • Teeth with a root canal treatment
  • Teeth that are loose or unstable

Your dentist will be able to advise you on whether a crown is the right treatment for you.

If you are considering a crown, your dentist will take x-rays and impressions of your teeth to create a custom mold. The mold will be used to make a replica of your teeth that will be used to design your crown. Once the design is finalized, the crown will be fabricated in a dental laboratory.

When you return for your final appointment, your dentist will remove the temporary crown and place the permanent crown on your tooth. The crown may be slightly uncomfortable for a few days while your teeth adjust to the new restoration. You should avoid chewing on hard objects or drinking hot liquids until the discomfort subsides.

Conclusion:

Crowns are a common and effective way to improve the appearance and function of your teeth. If you are considering a crown, be sure to talk to your dentist about the treatment options available to you.